Tag Archives: Alaska Oil and Gas Recruiters

No fishy business here: On Alaska’s LNG relationship with Japan

Beginning in September of this year, a formal dialogue began between a Japanese bank and Alaska’s Department of Natural Resources. The topic of this conversation: liquid natural gas (LNG).

Included in this conversation:  an enormous LNG project that could be equivalent to creating another Trans Alaska Pipeline. An agreement was signed by Alaska’s Commissioner of Natural Resources, Dan Sullivan, and the Managing Director of the Japanese Bank of International Cooperation, Koichi Yajima (Alex Demarban, www.alaskadispatch.com). There are several options being thrown around for new Alaska LNG production, and the biggest one would cost upwards $65 billion.

For years Alaska has maintained a close export-relationship with its north Pacific neighbor Japan, and the love is indeed felt. And it’s not just the exportation of Alaska’s clean, cold water and high quality, sushi-grade seafood. According to Sullivan, “Alaska has supplied LNG to Japan for more than 40 years and has an unmatched record of reliability” (alaskadispatch.com). The Japanese bank interested in financing the potential LNG project in the 49th State already actively invests in international oil and gas projects.

One project that is apparently losing steam in Alaska (partly due to lack of financing interest elsewhere as well as discrepancies between land lease-holders) is the Trans Canada pipeline. Exxon Mobil, ConocoPhillips, BP and pipeline builder Trans Canada are studying this project. This would be an 800 mile pipeline beginning on the North Slope, bringing gas to a LNG production facility on the Kenai Peninsula, and shipping that LNG abroad.

It is known that overall oil production in the state is decreasing.  Japan is experiencing an energy problem and the demand for it is outpacing actual supplies. Natural resources are not forever. There is greater urgency now within the local Alaskan government and energy circles to finalize plans for exploration and development of a new energy resource.

Monika Banic
Recruitment ConsultantThe Global Edge Consultants

The Global Edge Consultants is a full service firm specializing in the recruitment of technical and project personnel for industries such as Government, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Chemical, Engineering, Power, Nuclear and Manufacturing. Check out our careers page!

Photo courtesy LNG News

When it comes to geoscience, Anchorage rocks

Did you know that Anchorage, Alaska has recently been named one of the top cities for geoscientists in the nation?

Some major factors that contribute to this ranking are high average salaries within the industry (average is over $100k); numerous opportunities for employment in both private and government agencies; and active recruitment of graduates from local universities. This includes recruiting Alaskan students who choose to return to the state after graduating from an out-of-state college.

According to the University of Alaska’s Geology Department chair, students who graduate from the program can look forward to a 100% job placement rate- so college freshmen, take note.

Also, the high costs of living in Alaska’s largest city are often offset by the high median salary- just another perk of being a geoscientist living and working in the 49th State.

Geoscientists are directly involved in the exploration and production of oil and gas.
Within the energy industry, most geologists work either in mineral extraction, petroleum or environmental firms.

With new and continuing exploration and development projects underway all over Alaska, the need for professionals specializing in the geosciences is posed to be a stable and critical force for years to come.

Monika Banic
Recruitment Consultant
The Global Edge Consultants

The Global Edge Consultants is a full service firm specializing in the recruitment of technical and project personnel for industries such as Government, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Chemical, Engineering, Power, Nuclear and Manufacturing. Check out our careers page!

Behind the energy renaissance in the Western Hemisphere

It’s no surprise that North and South America has quickly become the center of attention within the Oil and Gas industry on a worldwide scale.
Oil and Gas development has been focused on The Middle East for decades, so what’s behind the shift?

Albeit unconventional, recent discoveries have proven prosperous in the deepest blue waters of Brazil and Gulf of Mexico, the Canadian oil sands, and of course, US shale production.

“There can be no doubt that America is in the midst of an energy renaissance,” says global energy guru Joseph Stanislaw.  A few years ago, experts believed that most of the global oil supply would stem from the Soviet Union and Middle East.  However, many now confidently claim that oil production within the US, Brazil, Canada, and Venezuela will soon be completely self-sufficient.

For the first time since the mid-90s, the U.S is producing more oil than any other import.  A few important points are attributed to this growth:

•    Shale – Shale gas has experienced a significant surge allowing the US to be a net natural gas exporter. Locations such as North Dakota and Midland/Odessa have experienced massive activity which could more than triple the current American output of shale oil to five million barrels a day by 2017.  This shale oil boom is considered to be a U.S. phenomenon.
•    Deepwater – New technology is allowing massive oil drilling in North and South America, from Canada to Brazil and Argentina.  In fact, 90% of Brazil’s oil reserves are in the deepest of offshore waters.
•    Canada – Crude oil has increased by nearly 50% in the last 5 years making Canada the fifth largest producer of oil in the world.

The US oil and gas boom has shown considerable benefits within the job market, economic development and overall competitiveness within the industry.

While this story is still unfolding, it’s safe to proclaim that America’s oil and gas revival certainly commands a new way of thinking.

Amy West
Account Manager
The Global Edge Consultants

The Global Edge Consultants is a full service firm specializing in the recruitment of technical and project personnel for industries such as Government, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Chemical, Engineering, Power, Nuclear and Manufacturing. Check out our careers page!

What is your brand? (First in a 3-part series)

What is an “elevator speech” and why do I need one?

The “elevator speech” or “pitch” as it is also referred to, is a quick synopsis of what you do and the message that you want to convey to the person to whom you are presenting.  It is normally meant to be under a minute in length with the intent of driving interest in you and your brand”.  (We’ll get more into “branding” over the next two parts of this series.)

The term “elevator speech” comes from the idea that you have a short amount of time to engage a captive audience before they move on to the next task or person, or the amount of time it takes for a quick elevator ride from one floor to another.

If you are in sales and/or marketing, you probably already know the purpose of an “elevator speech”, however, very few people actually have developed one much less honed it to near perfection.

So, how do you craft an “elevator speech?”

The real questions to ask yourself in this regard are:

1) How do I explain what I do without labeling myself?

2) What can I say that will make my audience want to engage in a longer conversation whether at that moment or shortly after?

Chris King, the editor and author of “Powerful Presentations,” points out that one of the first questions people tend to ask upon first meeting is “What do you do?”

The normal response is to literally state your job title, which immediately labels you in their mind with all of the stereotypes that go along with it.

As a recruiter, the term that usually comes to mind is a “headhunter,” and that label has so many negative connotations.  This is easily remedied by explaining what you do and the benefits that you bring to your clients.

For example, instead of answering the question with the recruiter job title, a better response would be “I work with large and small companies to help them locate the talent they so desperately need for extremely hard-to-find roles.”

This response clearly describes not only what I do and who I do it for, but also the benefits I am bringing to the table. I can then go into more details and specifics as to markets I specialize in as I gauge my audience’s interest.

Once you strip away the typical response, you remove any negative barriers and you open yourself up to a completely different conversation that may be lucrative down the line.

Remember, your presentation should be short and concise and you should practice it any chance you get.  As they say practice makes perfect, and the more you use it, the better it gets.

Part 2 in this series will begin to focus more on your personal “brand.”  Your “brand” not only states what you do, but who you are and how you conduct business.

Humberto Ramirez
Senior Technical Recruiter
The Global Edge Consultants

The Global Edge Consultants is a full service firm specializing in the recruitment of technical and project personnel for industries such as Government, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Chemical, Engineering, Power, Nuclear and Manufacturing. Check out our careers page!

E&P spending trends upward in United States

Ernest & Young recently reported that U.S. oil and gas investments have been at its highest peak in at least a decade.  What’s contributed to this fact?

One of the main reasons is the tight oil and natural gas liquids activity that is happening here on our very own soil in the United States.

With tight oil and natural gas liquids development, there are a lot of risks involved for E&P companies.

Experts have to be precise on the tight oil drill spot and the extraction of natural gas and then turning it to a liquid form is a complex process.

Because of the complexity of these two developments, the major exploration and production companies have to invest more money and time.  Studies indicate large U.S. oil companies increased their E&P spending by 20% from previous year.

While oil companies are seeing an increase in their spending, they are experiencing a 58% decrease in their after-tax profits due to the cheap rates for natural gas.

It would be ideal if our vehicles can operate on natural gas because there’s an abundance of it! Unfortunately for now, we will continue to pay soaring gas prices to make up the cost to produce what we essentially need every day by the oil & gas E&P companies.

Vickie Nguyen
Senior Resourcer
The Global Edge Consultants

The Global Edge Consultants is a full service firm specializing in the recruitment of technical and project personnel for industries such as Government, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Chemical, Engineering, Power, Nuclear and Manufacturing. Check out our careers page!

With millennials entering oil and gas, times are changing

Recruiting efforts in the oil and gas industry become challenging when the client requests specific requirements.  Usually, these specific requirements do not fit millennial-age candidates due to lack of experience. So what makes these professionals in their 20s and 30s not as attractive?

Millennials are more likely to jump from one job to another for various reasons.  One reason is clients are leaning more towards contract jobs which may last under a year due to operating on a project-driven basis. Millennial candidates take on these short-term jobs to gain experience on different types of projects.  Once the contract ends, the candidate is immediately ready to move on to the next project.  Second, millennials have a reputation for seeking better compensation and deals.  They are more prone to take a new opportunity for a small raise than stay at their current position and finish out their assignment. These reasons will hurt their chances for getting hired, because today’s hiring managers like seeing longevity on resumes.  When recruiters are screening for candidates and don’t see longevity, the resume most often goes to the back burner.

In order to attract and retain the next generation of oil and gas talent, business leaders need to understand and observe the changing times in the recruitment industry.  Managers will need to accept a more diverse workforce with different levels of experience and also expose their staff to new opportunities that lets them gain new experiences.  Although millennials are criticized as self-centered and lazy, they are more educated than ever. It is expected that this generation will be the leaders in the oil and gas industry in the next 15-20 years.

Vickie Nguyen
Senior Resourcer
The Global Edge Consultants

It’s not easy to recruit for oil sands production

One of the fastest growing oil and gas markets in the world is our own friendly northern neighbor: Canada.

The province of Alberta is the focal point of this country’s dominance in energy production. According to www.energy.alberta.ca, Alberta ranks third, after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela, in terms of proven global crude oil reserves, and accounts for an overwhelming majority (about 98 percent) of Canada’s oil reserves.  In 2011, Alberta’s total proven oil reserves were 170.2 billion barrels, or about 11 percent of total global oil reserves (1,523 billion barrels). The rapid expansion of oil sands production has made oil critical to not just this province, but to the Canadian economy as a whole. As we know, with increased production comes a need for increased resources and manpower. It is estimated that production is connected to 75,000 jobs nationwide, and this number is expected to increase over the next 25 years. (RigZone)

The task of recruiting individuals to fill these jobs is becoming an issue. While salaries are good, it is difficult to draw people to work in extreme environments such as those experienced in rural Alberta. This is a growing concern across the board with Canadian oil & gas and government authorities.

According to Cheryl Knight, executive director and CEO of the Petroleum HR Council, “At a granular level, we’re seeing high demand for, and reduced supply of, skilled workers in specific occupations, many of which are unique to the oil and gas industry. And employee turnover is the wild card that could have recruiters working to fill hundreds of additional job openings over the next four years.”

One of the major steps being made for now and the upcoming years will be to recruit workers outside of Canada, especially now that changes are coming into place with the Canadian government’s immigration system. The hopes for these changes are that they will expedite the immigration process for non-citizen workers through a more responsive, efficient course, which will in turn create a positive impact on the country’s economic needs.  Out of the top ten recommended US cities for recruiting these workers, nine of them are located in the states of Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. The top five cities on the list are in Texas: Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth, Corpus Christi, Longview-Marshall and Odessa. (RigZone) With highly populated areas come more resources and more workers. Recent collaboration between Canadian and US state departments are creating programs to further facilitate these processes, and the opportunities for employment in the oil and gas industry will only continue to broaden, as well as opportunities for recruiters to fill those jobs.

Monika Banic
Recruitment Consultant
The Global Edge Consultants

The Global Edge Consultants is a full service firm specializing in the recruitment of technical and project personnel for industries such as Government, Oil and Gas, Petrochemical, Chemical, Engineering, Power, Nuclear and Manufacturing. Check out our careers page!